Historic DC

Lafayette, We Are Here!

When the U.S. sent its army to defend France in the First World War, General John J. Pershing presided ...

Thanksgiving from the Very Beginning

The so-called first Thanksgiving occurred in Plymouth Colony, Mass., in 1621. It was a feast held one year after the ...

The National Cathedral: Echoes of the Middle Ages

When Pierre l’Enfant drew his plan for the City of Washington, it included a “national church,” which he thought ...

50 Years On: Jack & Jackie In Our Lives

Those of us who were alive on that day all remember where we were and how we felt when we ...

Adams & Jefferson, July 4, 1826

It seems nearly impossible to suppose that two of the Founding Fathers and ex-presidents could have both died on the ...

Francis I: the Irony of a Jesuit Pope

Pope Francis I is the first Jesuit ever elected to the papacy, which during the 18th century dissolved his religious order. The Society of Jesus was restored after 41 years.

One Hero’s Sad Fate

Unfortunately, we live in an era where heroes are suspect. Larger-than-life figures like Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln have been ...

Those Were the Days

The party scene in Washington changes with different administrations, and each presidency has a subtle but important influence on its ...

Reading Lincoln

Like the cathedrals of Europe, many of our monuments in Washington are rich with symbolism, and can be “read,” especially ...

Riding through Washington

Captured in bronze, forever surveying the field of action and gearing up for battle, the Civil War generals are with ...

At 100, the Cherry Trees: Enduring and Fragile Sign of Spring

This spring marks the 100-year anniversary of Japan’s gift of cherry trees to beautify the Tidal basin and National ...

The Iconic Obelisk

The Washington Monument is the single most recognized icon in our cityscape, yet its creation had a turbulent beginning, middle ...

Under the French Influence of Jules de Sibour

In the 6th arrondissement in Paris, where the rue des Beaux-Arts meets rue Bonaparte, stands a venerable building which was more influential on architecture in Washington than any other institution, present or past. The Ecole des Beaux-Arts was the training ground for so many great American architects in the Gilded Era of Washington, including the charming maestro of Beaux Arts architecture, Jules Henri de Sibour.

Alice Blue Gown

Lucky the girl who has a best-selling song named after her! In this case, the girl was one of the ...

The Willard: Birthplace of ‘Battle Hymn’

While historians generally believe the term “lobbyist” came from England circa 1800, it is part of our local lore that ...

The Queen and her Castle

Washington’s Gilded Era between 1880 and 1929 had its share of characters, and Mary Foote Henderson was one of ...

The Origins of DC's Landscape

How the D.C. Height of Buildings Act and the plans of many gifted thinkers created the unique cityscape we enjoy today.

Sun, 13 Jul 2014 04:16:31 -0400

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