Georgetown Spring Gallery Walk, April 17

Reaching for Spring I by Jean-François Debongnie
Reaching for Spring I by Jean-François Debongnie

The Georgetown galleries on Book Hill are one of the last remaining clusters of local art in the city. Along a few blocks of Wisconsin Avenue, the galleries call to us through their windows with wine, music and the chattery buzz of mingling art lovers.

And the buzz is never better than in spring, when gallery walks signal the arrival of a new season as surely as the blooming of the cherry blossoms.

Book Hill’s annual spring gallery walk offers a fine variety of works to explore, from renowned glasswork to calligraphy, the contemporary and the avant-garde. Using the guide below, experience it for yourself. Stand in front of a painting on a balmy spring evening with a glass of wine in one hand and a nibble of Roquefort in the other. I dare you not to feel good. More information is available at GeorgetownGalleries.com.

Addison/Ripley Fine Art

1670 Wisconsin Ave. NW

Kay Jackson: Malthusian Paintings, Twenty-five Years and Counting Kay Jackson is a local artist whose paintings have garnered national and international acclaim, including a commission by President Clinton for the official White House holiday card in 1997. She has long focused her work on addressing environmental concerns such as endangered species, pollution and loss of animal habitat.

All We Art

1666 33rd St. NW

Forms of the Journey: Félix Angel, Marta Luz Gutierrez, and Jesus Matheus The three artists share their work as part of their experience as individuals committed to artistic recreation of the journey that started several decades ago when they migrated to the United States.

Artist’s Proof Gallery

1533 Wisconsin Ave. NW

Jean-François Debongnie: Les Printemps Belgian artist Jean-François Debongnie is a self-taught artist who works exclusively in water-based acrylic and Chinese ink. His canvases seamlessly straddle seemingly disparate elements: old and new; organic and synthetic; vibrant ochre, blue, and red against muted shades of gray and black.

Cross MacKenzie Gallery

1675 Wisconsin Ave. NW

Blast Off: Views of Man and Flight “Blast Off!” is a group exhibition celebrating man’s passionate quest for flight. Presenting seven accomplished contemporary artists, including five whose work has flown in from Switzerland, New York, Pennsylvania and Montana and represents multiple mediums: painting, photography and ceramic sculpture.

Maurine Littleton Gallery

1667 Wisconsin Ave. NW

Botanical Wanderings Featuring works in glass and vitreographs (prints made from glass plates), “Botanical Wanderings” includes work by Cynthia Bringle, Edwina Bringle, David Dodge Lewis, John Littleton and Kate Vogel, Peter Loewer, Judith O’Rourke and Hiroshi Yamano.

Neptune Fine Art

1662 33rd St. NW

Modern & Contemporary: Masterworks on Paper The exhibition features works by Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Chuck Close, Robert Longo and Joan Mitchell.

Robert Brown Gallery

1662 33rd St. NW

Stephen Addiss: Thirty Years of Discoveries: Paintings, Calligraphy and Ceramics Stephen Addiss is a painter, poet, ceramicist, musician and Japanese art historian. He began studying calligraphy and ink painting in 1969 with Asian scholars, later studying in Japan and Taiwan. This exhibition features over thirty years of ink paintings, calligraphy and ceramics.

Susan Calloway Fine Arts

1643 Wisconsin Ave. NW

Karen Silve: Layered Memories, The In-Between After spending the summer in the South of France, Karen Silve reflects on the differences between older and new memories. Her seductive, painterly abstractions reveal a unique expression of harmonious colors: bright and joyous, warm and sensual, cool and luscious.

Washington Printmakers Gallery

1641 Wisconsin Ave. NW

Jack Boul: Monotypes Jack Boul’s works are included in major collections across the country – the National Gallery of Art made a recent acquisition – and his distinguished exhibition record stretches back 60 years. Most of the works in this show date from the past two years.

Previous
1
Next
Comments are temporarily disabled.
Tue, 25 Apr 2017 00:54:55 -0400

Subscribe to our newsletter to receive the latest Georgetowner updates.